HiStorytelling

A FotoJo

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Nat Turner: Maniacal Murderer or Virtuous Visionary? | News | Philadelphia Magazine

Nat Turner: Maniacal Murderer or Virtuous Visionary?

Understanding the legal definition of murder helps to answer the question


Read more at http://www.phillymag.com/news/2011/08/22/nat-turner-maniacal-murderer-virtuous-visionary/#365KkAP541KE7KkG.99

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soulbrotherv2:

The Resurrection of Nat Turner, Part 1: The Witnesses: A Novel by Sharon Ewell Foster

The Resurrection of Nat Turner, Part 2: The Testimony: A Novel by Sharon Ewell Foster

Leading a small army of slaves, Nat Turner was a man born with a mission: to set the captives free. When words failed, he ignited an uprising that left over fifty whites dead. In the predawn hours of August 22, 1831, Nat Turner stormed into history with a Bible in one hand, brandishing a sword in the other. His rebellion shined a national spotlight on slavery and the state of Virginia and divided a nation’s trust. Turner himself became a lightning rod for abolitionists like Harriet Beecher Stowe and a terror and secret shame for slave owners. 

The Resurrection of Nat Turner, Part 1: The Witnesses, Nat Turner’s story is revealed through the eyes and minds of slaves and masters, friends and foes. In their words is the truth of the mystery and conspiracy of Nat Turner’s life, death, and confession.  [book link]

The Resurrection of Nat Turner, Part 2: The Testimony, relates the whole story—from Turner’s early slave years with his Ethiopian-born mother through the uprising, his trial, and hanging—from Nat’s perspective. It’s a story full of greed and betrayal, faith and courage, villains and heroes.  [bool link]

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lowcountrydigitallibrary:

The Diary of Charles Drayton I, 1791-1798. Includes day-to-day management of Drayton plantations, (particularly Drayton Hall, Jehossee and Long Savannah), focusing on crops, livestock, labor, and the movement of these between estates. Charles describes (in brief) meeting and dining with President George Washington and receiving plant specimens from Thomas Jefferson.
Drayton Papers, 1701-2004

lowcountrydigitallibrary:

The Diary of Charles Drayton I, 1791-1798. Includes day-to-day management of Drayton plantations, (particularly Drayton Hall, Jehossee and Long Savannah), focusing on crops, livestock, labor, and the movement of these between estates. Charles describes (in brief) meeting and dining with President George Washington and receiving plant specimens from Thomas Jefferson.

Drayton Papers, 1701-2004

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thesmithian:


Slavery in America often conjures images of antebellum plantations with sprawling fields worked by weary black folks picking cotton or tobacco under the hot sun and the watchful eye of a whip-yielding white overseer. This…is the picture of slavery most often presented to us in books, on television and in the movies. But the history of slavery in Florida challenges that cliche and reveals that black people were a diverse lot.

more.

thesmithian:

Slavery in America often conjures images of antebellum plantations with sprawling fields worked by weary black folks picking cotton or tobacco under the hot sun and the watchful eye of a whip-yielding white overseer. This…is the picture of slavery most often presented to us in books, on television and in the movies. But the history of slavery in Florida challenges that cliche and reveals that black people were a diverse lot.

more.

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apatheticpussy asked: The photo of "temple made gentrification" you posted on June 4... What street is that on?

19th Street, near Diamond #Philly

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There are “2805 [documented] victims of lynch mobs killed between 1882 and 1930… the vast majority, almost 2,500, of lynch victims were African-American.

"Lethal mob violence for seemingly minor infractions of the caste codes of behavior was more fundamental for maintaining terroristic social control than punishment for what would seem to be more serious violations of the criminal codes" (19).  

History of Lynching in the United StatesJana Evans Braziel, Assistant ProfessorDepartment of English and Comparative LiteratureUniversity of Cincinnati 

There are “2805 [documented] victims of lynch mobs killed between 1882 and 1930… the vast majority, almost 2,500, of lynch victims were African-American.

"Lethal mob violence for seemingly minor infractions of the caste codes of behavior was more fundamental for maintaining terroristic social control than punishment for what would seem to be more serious violations of the criminal codes" (19).  

History of Lynching in the United States
Jana Evans Braziel, Assistant Professor
Department of English and Comparative Literature
University of Cincinnati 

(Source: umass.edu)

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todayinhistory:

August 21st 1831: Nat Turner’s rebellion begins

On this day in 1831 the Virginian slave Nat Turner began the deadliest slave rebellion the United States had ever seen, which resulted in the deaths of 55 whites. Turner, a slave preacher, had come to believe that God intended for him to lead a black uprising against the injustice of slavery. In the evening of August 21st 1831, Turner and his co-conspirators met in the woods to make their plans and early the next morning began the rebellion by killing Turner’s master’s family. Turner and his men, who soon numbered over 80, then went from house to house assaulting the white inhabitants. Eventually a local militia, and then federal and state troops, confronted the rebels and dispersed the group. Turner himself initially evaded capture but was captured on October 30th. Subsequently Turner, along with over fifty other rebels, was executed. However the retribution for Nat Turner’s rebellion did not end there. The uprising sent shockwaves across the South, and while full scale rebellion such as Turner’s was rare in the Deep South due to the rigid enforcement of the slave system, caused widespread fear of another rebellion. In the ensuing hysteria over 200 innocent black slaves were killed by white mobs. Turner’s rebellion came close to ending slavery in Virginia, as in its wake the state legislature considered abolishing the ‘peculiar institution’. However the measure was voted down and instead the state decided to increase plantation discipline and limit slaves’ autonomy even further by banning them from acting as preachers and learning to read. Similar measures were adopted across the slave-holding South and thus Nat Turner’s rebellion increased the South’s commitment to slavery, despite undermining the pro-slavery argument that it was a benevolent system and slaves were content. Turner has left behind a complicated legacy, with some seeing him as an African-American hero and others as a religious fanatic and villain; his memory raises the eternal question of whether violence is justified to bring about necessary change.

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Mulatto Yellow Girl

'Twenty-six black girls not make mulatto yellow girl'

from

Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839

 By Fanny Kemble 

'Twenty-six black girls not make mulatto yellow girl' quoted in “Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation, 1838-1839” by Fanny Kemble.

Fanny Kemble, a London actress and wife of Pierce Butler, a Georgia plantation owner, recorded in her journal the musical performances of her Negro boatmen on daily voyages up and down the river. 
One of the black men’s songs … embodied the opinion that “twenty-six black girls not make mulatto yellow girl;” … This desperate tendency to despise and undervalue their own race and color, which is one of the very worst results of their abject condition…

Filed under colorism self hate race in america

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Their Little Vanities

WATSON’S ANNALS of
PHILADELPHIA and 
PENNSYLVANIA 

Chapter 8.               NEGROES  AND  SLAVES

  In the olden time, dressy blacks and dandy coloured beaux and belles, as we now see them issuing from their proper churches, were quite unknown.

Their aspirings and little vanities have been rapidly growing since they got those separate churches, and have received their entire exemption from slavery.  Once they submitted to the appellation of servants, blacks, or negroes, but now they require to be called ‘coloured people’, and among themselves, their common call of salutation is — gentlemen and ladies.

Thirty to forty years ago, they were much humbler, more esteemed in their place, and more useful to themselves and others.  As a whole they show an overweening fondness for display and vainglory — fondly imitating the whites in processions and banners, and in the pomp and pageantry of Masonic and Washington societies, &c. 

With the kindest feelings for their race, judicious men wish them wiser conduct, and a better use of the benevolent feelings which induced their emancipation among us.

Qtd. in:

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Freedom Road Cemetery. Pennsylvania by Railroad. On the road from Philadelphia to Williamsport, PA to present “Great Escapes” Stories of the Underground Railroad, A Pennsylvania Humanities Council Commonwealth Speakers presentation at James V. Brown Library. 
Sponsored by: Blooming Grove Historical Society & Muncy Historical Society 
July 12, 2014 
Photos by Denise Valentine, Storyteller and Historical Performer. 

Freedom Road CemeteryPennsylvania by Railroad. On the road from Philadelphia to Williamsport, PA to present “Great Escapes” Stories of the Underground Railroad, A Pennsylvania Humanities Council Commonwealth Speakers presentation at James V. Brown Library. 

Sponsored by: Blooming Grove Historical Society & Muncy Historical Society 

July 12, 2014 

Photos by Denise Valentine, Storyteller and Historical Performer. 

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Great Escapes - A Commonwealth Speakers Presentation with Denise Valentine
WILLIAMSPORT, PA ~ As part of the Year of Learning and Focus on the Underground Railroad presented by Muncy Historical Society, the Blooming Grove Historical Society and James V. Brown Library will host Commonwealth Speaker Denise Valentine’s presentation “Great Escapes” at 1 p.m. Saturday, July 12 in the Library’s Lowry Room, 19 E. Fourth St.

Great Escapes - A Commonwealth Speakers Presentation with Denise Valentine

WILLIAMSPORT, PA ~ As part of the Year of Learning and Focus on the Underground Railroad presented by Muncy Historical Society, the Blooming Grove Historical Society and James V. Brown Library will host Commonwealth Speaker Denise Valentine’s presentation “Great Escapes” at 1 p.m. Saturday, July 12 in the Library’s Lowry Room, 19 E. Fourth St.

(Source: muncyhistoricalsociety.wordpress.com)

Filed under Pennsylvania Humanities Council Underground Railroad lycoming

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National Association of Black Storytellers (NABS) 2nd Annual Storytelling Contest 2014: Lighting the Way: Stories of Our Heroes/Sheroes, Past & Present, In Our Homes and In Our Nation. This year’s contest provides the opportunity to crown our unsung and unknown Heroes/Shereos. Learn More: www.nabsinc.org/storytelling-contest. 

National Association of Black Storytellers (NABS) 2nd Annual Storytelling Contest 2014: Lighting the Way: Stories of Our Heroes/Sheroes, Past & Present, In Our Homes and In Our Nation. This year’s contest provides the opportunity to crown our unsung and unknown Heroes/Shereos. Learn More: www.nabsinc.org/storytelling-contest. 

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Stories to Heal the Heart

As a youth, I joined a chorus of 1000 young women from all over the world. We’d practiced in our respective cities for a year. We had one week to practice together in Hawaii. We couldn’t talk to each other but we sang together beautifully in Japanese and English. 

THE 5th SGI WORLD PEACE YOUTH CULTURE FESTIVAL 
1985 – Waikiki Shell, Honolulu – Hawai 

Read more… 

Filed under masterpeace